Ask the Experts Blog: Physician Recruitment & Healthcare Industry Trends

If you are an in-house physician recruiter attempting to fill search assignments, you may have questions about the physician recruitment process. "Ask the Experts" is a blog designed to address common physician recruiter questions and to participate in discussion. Physician recruiters can submit questions, and the experienced search consultants at Merritt Hawkins will provide insight, addressing common themes that emerge. Share your feedback by commenting on blog posts, allowing readers to benefit from the perspectives of other healthcare professionals. We encourage you to read, participate and submit questions at "Ask the Experts!"


2017 Physician Incentive Review Now Available

Family Doctors Top the List of the Most Highly Recruited Physicians in the US


2017 Merritt Hawkins Physician Incentive Review Image

By Travis Singleton


It’s an annual occurrence that has become a key point on the calendar for healthcare executives, recruiters, media members, doctors and others who follow physician recruitng trends.


I refer to the release of Merritt Hawkins’ Review of Physician and Advanced Practitioner Recruiting Incentives, the longest running and most comprehensive examination of the starting salaries, signing bonuses and other perks and benefits used to recruit physicians today.


Merritt Hawkins’ 2017 Review has just been completed and includes data generated by the 3,287 physician and advanced practitioner recruiting assignments Merritt Hawkins and its sister companies conducted from April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017.


For the 11th consecutive year, the Review indicates that family doctors top the list of the most highly recruited physicians in the United States, followed by psychiatrists, internists, obstetrician/gynecologists, and hospitalists. The average starting salary for family physicians is $231,000, according to the 2017 Review, up from $198,000 in 2015, an increase of 17%. The average starting salary for psychiatrists is $263,000, according to the Review, up from $226,000 two years ago, while the average starting salary for general internists is $257,000, up from $207,000 two years ago.


In addition to data on physician starting salaries and other incentives, the Review includes an in-depth analysis of the demographic, economic and legislative trends shaping the physician recruiting market today. It is an indispensable resource for those seeking to craft competitive physician recruiting incentive packages and for those seeking insights into today’s physician market dynamics. A breakdown of key findings of the survey offers a quick look at some of the data included in the 2017 Review. Those who would like a complete copy of the 46-page Review are welcome to email me here.  


Travis Singleton is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here.




If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Physician Compensation
Posted by at 6/6/2017 2:05:23 PM
Physicians Not On Board With The AHCA

Physician Survey on the AHCA

By Phil Miller


Physicians Not On Board With The AHCA

Historically, physicians have rarely been supportive of government sponsored legislation intended to shape how healthcare is delivered in the United States.


According to a new survey conducted by Merritt Hawkins, this lack of support extends to the American Health Care Act (AHCA) – at least to the version recently passed by the House.


The survey of 1,112 physicians indicates that 66% of physicians have a negative impression of the AHCA, only 26% have a positive impression, and seven percent are neutral.


In a 2016 survey of 17,236 physicians that Merritt Hawkins conducted on behalf of The Physicians Foundation, 23% of physicians gave the Affordable Care Act (ACA) a positive grade of A or B, 28% gave it an average grade of C, while 48% gave it a negative grade of D or F. The AHCA, now being considered by the Senate, gets an even higher negative rating, according to the new Merritt Hawkins survey. Fifty-eight percent of those surveyed have a strongly negative impression of the bill, 8% have a somewhat negative impression, while relatively few (7%) are neutral.


The survey has an error rate of +/- 2.87% as determined by experts in statistical response at the University of Tennessee and echoes statements from the American Medical Association and other physician groups that have come out against the bill. Read what Forbes had to say regarding the survey here.


I would welcome any comments others may have about the ACHA and about how the healthcare system can or should be reformed.


Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here .




If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 5/18/2017 8:28:02 AM
The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact: Less Bureaucracy and Better Access to Care

Physician Licensing Across State-lines

 

Phil Miller


Here is a man bites dog story that anyone in the healthcare industry is sure to appreciate. An initiative has been launched that will actually reduce bureaucratic paperwork and increase access to physicians for patients in states that traditionally have experienced physician shortages.


The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact offers an expedited pathway to licensure for physicians who want to practice in multiple states. There are now 19 states participating in the Compact, with others planning to do so (see map).


The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact: Less Bureaucracy and Better Access to Care

Through the Compact it is expected that the time to licensure physicians will be cut in half in participating states. This is a significant benefit for hospitals, medical groups and other facilities recruiting physicians, as it will streamline a process that often proves a hindrance and even a deal breaker when trying to secure a new physician. It will bring physicians to places where they are needed faster and accelerate the implementation of telemedicine, which also can be slowed by the licensure process. And it will be a welcome relief for physicians, who already have to deal with an inordinate amount of paperwork.


Physicians who wish to qualify for expedited licensure via the Compact must hold a full, unrestricted medical license in a Compact member state, and at least one of the following must apply:


  • The physician’s primary residence is in the state of principal licensure (SPL)
  • At least 25% of his or her practice occurs in the SPL
  • His or her employer is located in the SPL
  • The physician uses the SPL has his or her state of residence for U.S. federal income tax purposes

In addition, physicians must have:


  • Graduated from an accredited medical school, or a school listed in the International Medical Education Directory
  • Successful completion of ACGME or AOA-accredited graduate medical education
  • Passed each component of the USMLE, COMPL-USA, or equivalent after no more than three attempts
  • Hold a current specialty certification or time-unlimited certification by an ABMS or AOA board
  • Must not have any disciplinary actions toward their medical licensure
  • Must not have any criminal history
  • Must not have controlled substance actions toward their license
  • Must not currently be under investigation

The Compact is voluntary for both states and physicians. Physicians who cannot or do not want to participate in the Compact can still obtain licenses in Compact states going through the traditional licensure process.


To obtain licenses through the Compact, an eligible physician will designate a member state as the state of principal licensure (SPL) and select the other member states in which a medical license is desired. The SPL will verify the physician’s eligibility and provide credential information to the Interstate Commission. The Commission will then collect applicable fees and transmit the physician’s information and licensure fees to the additional states. Upon receipt in the additional states, the physician will be granted a license.


The Compact offers a sensible solution to address a growing problem and is picking up momentum as more states come on board and as more physicians participate. I would be happy to hear from readers who can comment on how the Compact has affected them or is likely to.


Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here .





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 5/18/2017 8:01:20 AM
Physician Recruiting Professionals: The 'Source of the Source'

Join us at the ASPR Annual Meeting

Physician Recruiting Professionals: The 'Source of the Source'

By Travis Singleton

 

The tectonic plates underlying healthcare continue to shift at an unprecedented rate and it is difficult to know what the healthcare system will look like one year from now or even six months from now.


There is one thing that seems virtually certain, however, and that is that doctors will remain at the center of the system.


Whether legislation coming out of Washington eventually leads to a more market driven system or to single-payer, it is physicians who will drive quality, costs and revenue.


According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), physicians handle 1.2 billion patient visits a year in office settings and in hospital emergency departments. Little happens in healthcare, be it hospital admissions, prescriptions, tests, treatment plans, surgical and diagnostic procedures or hospital discharges that is not ordered by, performed by, or supervised by a physician.


According to the Boston University School of Health, physicians receive or direct 87% of personal health care spending in the U.S., while a study commissioned by the American Medical Association (AMA) indicates that each office-based physician generates $2.2 million in economy activity and supports an average of 14 jobs. Merritt Hawkins’ 2016 Survey of Physician Inpatient/Outpatient Revenue shows that, on average, physicians generate $1.5 million a year in net revenue on behalf of their affiliated hospital.


As payment systems evolve toward value-based metrics and away from volume-based metrics, physicians will be instrumental to enhancing quality of care by directing inter-professional care teams. They also will be critical to the bottom line through the appropriate utilization of resources, which is the key to maintaining profitability in capitated payment models.


As the Association of Staff Physician Recruiters (ASPR) convenes for its annual meeting, it is appropriate to note both the continued vital importance of physicians and the corresponding importance of physician recruiting professionals. By identifying and securing qualified physicians for their organizations, physician recruiters are the “source of the source” of the patient care and revenue physicians provide.


Merritt Hawkins is proud to partner with ASPR members nationwide and to provide them with supplementary resources and market data when required. We will be attending the ASPR meeting in San Diego, April 29th to May 3rd and invite ASPR members to visit us at Booth 209. We look forward to seeing you there!


Travis Singleton is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here or at 469-524-1630 .





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 5/12/2017 12:45:08 PM
Survey: Physician Appointment Wait Times up 30% From 2014

 

Physician Supply and Demand Trends

2017 Survey of Physician Appointment Wait Times and Medicare and Medicaid Acceptance Rates

By Travis Singleton

 

At least two interesting developments in the arena of physician supply and demand trends took place in the same week of March this year.


One development was the release by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) of its projected physician shortage numbers. The AAMC projects that by 2030, the U.S. could be short of up to 104,900 physicians.


The second development was the release by Merritt Hawkins of its 2017 Survey of Physician Appointment Wait Times and Medicare and Medicaid Acceptance Rates. The survey indicates that the time it takes to schedule a new patient physician appointment in 15 major metropolitan areas has increased by 30 percent since 2014.


According to the survey, it now takes an average of 24 days to schedule a new patient physician appointment in 15 of the largest cities in the U.S., up from 18.5 days in 2014, 20.5 days in 2009 and 21 days in 2004, previous years the survey was conducted. In some cities and in some specialties, wait times are becoming extreme.


Boston is experiencing the longest average physician appointment wait times of the 15 metro markets examined in the survey: 109 days to see a family physician, 52 days to see a dermatologist, 45 days to see an obstetrician/gynecologist, 45 days to see a cardiologist and 11 days to see an orthopedic surgeon. On average, it takes 52 days to schedule a physician appointment in Boston, according to the survey.


Average physician appointment wait times in other cities tracked by the survey include 37 days in Philadelphia, 28 days in Portland, 28 days in Seattle, 27 days in Denver, and 24 days in Los Angeles.


The 2017 survey includes for the first time average new patient physician appointment wait times in 15 mid-sized metropolitan areas of approximately 90,000 to 140,000 people. The average time to schedule a new patient physician appointment in mid-sized metro areas is 32 days, or 33 percent longer than in the 15 major metro markets.


Yakima, Washington has the longest average physician appointment wait times of the 15 mid-sized cities at 49 days while Billings, Montana has the shortest at 11 days.


Though the health system appears to be on the threshold of yet another series of profound changes, one thing remains constant: the demand for physicians continues to outpace the supply.


The 2017 survey includes a wealth of data not only on physician appointment wait times but on the rate of physician Medicare and Medicaid acceptance. You can access the survey here.


Travis Singleton is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here or at 469-524-1630.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Doctor Shortage
Posted by at 4/27/2017 8:42:37 AM
The 2017 Residency Match: Good News and Bad News

Match Day 2017 Review

The 2017 Residency Match Good News/Bad News

By Tom Florence

 

Match Day 2017 served up some good news and some not so good news for those concerned by the prospect of ongoing physician shortages in America.


Match Day is the day in March when medical school graduates from both the United States and many countries abroad learn the location and specialty of the residency programs where they will train for the next three to seven years. It is a source of great joy to many medical school graduates who match to the programs they applied for and a source of disappointment to others who do not.


The good news is that a record-high 18,539 U.S. allopathic medical school seniors submitted program choices to the Match, and of these, 17,480 were accepted, for a match rate of 94.3%, according to a press release from the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP).


An additional 3,590 U.S. osteopathic seniors submitted program choices, an increase of 608 over 2016, and 2,933 (81.7%) matched, also a record high. Family medicine programs offered 3,356 positions, 209 more than in 2016, and 3,215 (95.8%) of positions were filled.


For non-U.S. medical school graduates the news is not so good. Of the 5,069 U.S. citizen international medical graduates (IMGs) who submitted program choices, only 54.8% matched. Of the 7,284 non-U.S. citizen IMGs who submitted program choices, only 52.4% matched.


Some of the medical school seniors, both U.S. graduates and IMGs, who did not match initially will find a program through the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP). But the fact remains that there are many more medical school seniors applying to the Match than there are openings at residency programs. Even some U.S. allopathic graduates now do not match and may find their path to becoming a practicing physician blocked.


The bottleneck is the cap placed by Congress two decades ago on Medicare funding for Graduate Medical Education (GME). While the number of U.S. medical graduates has increased by over 27% from 2002 to 2016, the number of residency positions has increased by less than 8%. Until the cap is removed, the supply of physicians being trained is unlikely to keep pace with demand for medical services, and medical school graduates, including many U.S. grads, will be unable to find a training program.


I would be interested to learn what others think of this year’s Match results and what can be done to address looming physician shortages.


Tom Florence is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here or at 800-876-0500.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Recruiting Physicians;Doctor Shortage
Posted by at 4/25/2017 11:44:50 AM
A Message on National Doctors' Day

We Need More Doctors

Happy Doctors Day 2017

By Phillip Miller

 

It’s appropriate on March 30 -- National Doctor’s Day -- to reflect on both the value physicians bring to society and how they are viewed from a public policy perspective.


Physicians in the U.S. handle an overwhelming 1.2 billion patient encounters a year in office, inpatient and emergency department settings, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). They diagnosis illness, admit patients to the hospital, prescribe drugs, develop treatment plans, perform complex procedures, coordinate care – and save and enhance countless lives in the process. Despite the growing role of other types of clinicians, physicians remain at the core of health care delivery and are indispensable as diagnosticians, surgeons, team leaders and patient advocates.


They also play a central economic role within the communities in which they practice. Each primary care physician supports 14 jobs and generates $2.2 million in economic activity, according to a study conducted by IMS Health for the American Medical Association (AMA).


Nevertheless, some policy makers believe that physicians represent a cost to the healthcare system rather than an asset. Those who hold that view remain committed to limiting the supply of doctors. This perspective recently was reflected in an article posted by the Journal of the American Medical Association in which the authors contend that there is no physician shortage and that the number of physicians being trained in the U.S. should not be increased.


A contrary perspective from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) also was posted by JAMA, in which the authors present the AAMC’s new projection that the U.S. will face a deficit of up to 104,900 doctors by 2030 and that consequently the number of physicians being trained in the U.S. should be increased.


On virtually the same day that these articles were posted, Merritt Hawkins released its 2017 Survey of Physician Appointment Wait Times indicating that the time it takes to schedule a new patient physician appointment in 15 major metro areas has increased by 30% since 2014 and now stands at an average of 24 days. In some metro areas the wait is much longer. In Boston, for example, the time to schedule a new patient appointment with a family medicine physician averages 109 days.


Nevertheless, in terms of actual policy, the perspective of those who believe that physician supply should be restricted prevails. Congress set a cap on the amount of funds spent on physician graduate medical education (GME) in 1997, and that cap remains in place, despite numerous bills submitted to Congress that would lift it. As a result, the number of new physicians being trained has increased only incrementally in the last 20 years while demand for medical services has rapidly accelerated.


As the nation’s leading physician search firm, Merritt Hawkins views physician supply and demand trends from what might be called the street level rather than the theoretical level. We understand how difficult it is to recruit physicians in today’s market, and we also are privileged to witness the profoundly beneficial effects physicians have on their patients and their communities. It is a pleasure on National Doctor’s Day to pay tribute to the remarkable, life-enhancing work that physicians do and to their unique skills, passion and commitment.


Physicians are a vital asset to the nation’s well-being and Merritt Hawkins is firmly in the camp of those who believe we should be training more of them. What messages would you like to convey about physicians on Doctor’s Day?


Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 4/11/2017 12:41:16 PM
Merritt Hawkins in the News - 2017 Q1 Review

Doctor Wait Times, MACRA, Healthcare Reform, and More


It is part of our ongoing mission to educate clients and candidates on the physician shortage and other employment and salary trends facing healthcare organizations across the nation. As part of this mission, Merritt Hawkins provides thought leadership and shared resources to the healthcare recruitment industry. In fact, our company has published or is cited in hundreds of articles appearing in a wide range of publications. The following are news articles from January 2017 - March 2017 referencing Merritt Hawkins.


 




If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Recruiting Physicians;Doctor Shortage
Posted by at 4/5/2017 12:28:08 PM
A Key New Blue Print For Primary Care Physicians

Primary Care Physicians and Population Health

Primary Care Physicians and Population Health

By Travis Singleton

 

The “New Health Economy” – one that is driven by value rather than volume and attempts to address the societal determinants of health -- will need many advocates and participants to become an effective reality.


Of these, primary care physicians may play the leading role. It is primary care physicians who will serve as the “quarterbacks” of interdisciplinary care teams ensuring proper resource allocation, a population health approach, and the other elements of value-based care.


A new resource from Price Waterhouse Cooper’s (PwC’s) Health Research Institute offers primary care physicians a guide for how they can prepare for and lead the healthcare system in this new direction. Preparing Future Primary Care Physicians for the New Health Economy is PwC’s guide to how primary care physicians can gain essential insight into:


  • What it means to deliver value 
  • Whole health basics and how to triage to a wide cast of clinical and nonclinical caregivers within the health system and the community 
  • How to coordinate/manage a patient across a growing number of options for care 
  • How to design data-driven, evidence-based care plans

Merritt Hawkins was pleased to provide data and insight into the preparation of this resource and to be part of the network of organizations PwC’s Health Research Institute calls upon when preparing studies of this kind.


Preparing Future Primary Care Physicians for the New Health Economy is a timely and practical guide not just for physicians but for any healthcare professional with a stake in steering the healthcare system toward a more value-based and communal approach.


The entire report can be accessed here. I encourage readers to review it and I would be interested in hearing any comments or questions you may have.


Travis Singleton is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here or at 469-524-1630.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 3/29/2017 10:41:39 AM
Behavioral Care in America: the Crisis Continues

 

Exploring Challenges in Behavioral Health and Psychiatry

Behavorial Care in America the Crisis Continues

By Phillip Miller

 

In March of this year, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), a branch of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) put out a statistical brief likely to cause consternation among providers of behavioral health services.


According to the brief, emergency department visits by adults with suicidal thoughts more than doubled from 2006 to 2013. On average, these visits rose by 12% each year over the seven year period.


By 2013, 1% of all adult ED visits were related to suicidal thoughts, up from 0.4% in 2013. In 2013, over 71% of ED visits linked to suicidal thoughts resulted in a hospital admission, compared to 19% of all other types of ED visits. The average length of stay for suicidal patients increased from 5.1 days to 5.6 days. The cost of these visits and subsequent hospitalizations rose from $600 million in 2006 to $2.2 billion in 2013.


These alarming statistics are yet another manifestation of the burgeoning crisis in behavioral care that is challenging healthcare providers nationwide. Another sign of the crisis is the rapid rise in demand for psychiatrists and other behavioral health professionals.


In 2016, psychiatry was Merritt Hawkins’ second most requested search assignment, trailing only family practice on the list of most in-demand medical specialties. This was the first time psychiatry has ranked so high. Ten years ago, psychiatry was 10th on the list.


There are a variety of reasons why behavioral health challenges continue to be so pressing. These reasons are explored in a Merritt Hawkins’ white paper entitled, Psychiatry: The Silent Shortage. The white paper both examines trends in the supply and demand for psychiatrists and discusses recruiting challenges in psychiatry. Merritt Hawkins also speaks on this subject before healthcare professional groups, most recently at a meeting of over 200 facility administrators held by hospital management company Universal Health Services on March 15.


I would be happy to forward a copy of the white paper to readers and I would welcome any comments you have about the current state of behavioral care in America.


Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications with Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AMN). He can be reached here.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Doctor Shortage
Posted by at 3/20/2017 1:05:46 PM
'Hillbilly Physician' is 2017 Country Doctor of the Year

Highlighting the Contributions of Rural Physicians

2017 Country Doctor of the Year

by Phil Miller


Dr. Van Breeding, a self-described "hillbilly physician" from Whitesburg, Kentucky, is the 2017 Country Doctor of the Year.


Presented by Staff Care, which, like Merritt Hawkins, is a company of AMN Healthcare, the Country Doctor of the Year Award honors the spirit, skill and dedication of America's rural medical practitioners.


Established in 1992, the County Doctor of the Year Award has been bestowed on some of the most extraordinary physicians in the United States, and Dr. Breeding is no exception. In this profile, HealthLeaders offers insights into the remarkable work Dr. Breeding is doing on behalf of his patients as he practices with Mountain Comprehensive Health, a community health center in Whitesburg.

Dr. Breeding's impact on his area of Appalachia also was depicted on a recent segment broadcast of ABC's Nightline program.


Merritt Hawkins is proud to be a part of an organization that highlights the vital contributions that rural physicians make every day to the well being of their patients.


If you would like more information on the Country Doctor of the Year Award, or if you would like to nominate a doctor that you may know for the award, please visit www.staffcare.com.


I would be pleased to hear from readers who have stories to tell about how rural physicians have affected their lives or the lives of people they may know.


Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins and Staff Care, companies of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 3/8/2017 7:37:47 AM
New White Paper Addresses Physician Turnover

Physician Turnover and Healthcare Staffing Trends

New White Paper Addresses Physician Turnover

In the so-called “golden age of medicine,” physicians followed a generally uniform career pattern. Complete residency, “set out a shingle” or join another physician as a prospective partner, practice for 30 or 40 years, retire.


Today, a new pattern has emerged in which most physicians are not independent practice owners but employees of hospitals, multi-physician medical groups, community health centers, urgent care centers, or a variety of other entities. They no longer have the emotional or financial ties that kept them practicing in one spot for years or decades. As practice owners, they typically owned the equipment in their offices, paid rent or owned the building, hired the employees and had all the responsibilities rewards that tie small business owners to their businesses.


As employees, they are relatively free to pull up stakes and seek greener pastures – and in an era when doctors are in great demand, they get many offers to do so. As a result, turnover among medical staffs has become a challenge for many healthcare facilities. According to the healthcare data company SK&A, the annual relocation rate for all physicians is 12%, with variations by specialty (see chart below):

 

   Annual Physician Relocation Rates by Specialty 

Urgent care….............………19.94% 

  Pain Management……………19.40% 

 Oncology……...................….17.85% 

 Radiology………..………….17.23% 

  Psychiatry……….……………14.7% 

 Family medicine………………13.47% 

 Internal medicine….………….11.98% 

 General surgery…………………11.17% 

 OB/GYN………………………10.66% 

 

 Source: SK&A Healthcare Provider Move Rates, August 2015 

 

With physician turnover a major challenge, many healthcare facilities are examining their retention programs to ensure they are able to keep the physicians they recruit. Merritt Hawkins recently completed a white paper outlining steps hospitals in particular can take to improve their relationship with their medical staffs. Entitled, Ten Keys to Enhancing Physician/Hospital Relations, the white paper outlines the how physician retention begins during the recruiting process and extends to establishing the most favorable “physician workshop” possible.


Though the white paper focuses on physician/hospital relations, the principles apply to other entities that employ physicians. I would be happy to provide readers who email me with a copy of the white paper and also would be glad to hear from readers who have developed their own physician retention strategies.


Travis Singleton is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 3/2/2017 12:09:30 PM
The Travel Ban and Foreign-born Physicians

Physicians and the Impact of the Travel Ban

Travel Ban and Foreign-born Physicians

There has been considerable speculation in the media lately regarding how the travel ban will affect foreign-born physicians, both from the seven nations affected and from other nations not currently on the list. Articles on this topic referencing Merritt Hawkins have appeared in the New York Times, U.S. New & World ReportForbes, and the Chicago Tribune.


Though the situation is still fluid and its impact on foreign-physicians hard to assess, it is apparent that the ban will have an immediate impact on a relatively small number of physicians. According to the Forbes article above, 260 medical graduates from the seven banned nations have applied for the 2017 resident Match, vying for some 27,860 positions. Given the current match rate for international medical graduates (IMGs), which hovers at slightly over 50%, approximately 130 of these applicants would be likely to match. A smaller number would then be likely to complete their residency programs and seek to practice in the U.S. The net number is therefore limited – probably around 100.


The larger question is what effect will the ban have on physicians from nations not on this list, who are likely to constitute a significant number of medical residents in 2017 and in subsequent years? The chart below showing 2016 matches for first-year residency positions offers some indication:

 

   2016 U.S. Residency Match – First Year Positions 

U.S. Allopathic Graduates…………18,187 

  Percent matched…………………….93.8% 

 U.S. Osteopathic Graduates……….2,982 

 Percent matched……………………….80.3% 

 U.S. Citizen IMGs…………………………5,323 

 Percent matched…………………………53.9% 

 Foreign-born IMGs…………………….7,460 

 Percent matched………………………50.5% 

 

 Source: National Resident Matching Program, March 18, 2016 

 

A combined 21,169 U.S. allopathic and osteopathic grads applied for the 2016 Match, leaving about 6,600 potential positions to be filled by IMGs (both U.S. citizen and foreign-born). U.S. citizen IMGs, who contributed about 2,800 medical graduates to the 2016 Match, are of course not affected by the ban. The same general numbers are likely for 2017. Foreign-born IMGs therefore represent a significant number of doctors in the pipeline (about 3,700 in the 2016 Match). They also represent a large number now in the workforce. Roughly one-quarter of in-practice physicians in the United States are foreign-born IMGs.


Should this source of physicians diminish as a direct or indirect result of the ban, it would have a significant impact on physician supply, reducing the number of FTEs during a time when the physician shortage is projected to grow. The issue is not confined to those medical graduates or physicians directly impacted by the ban. It extends to those from other countries, including non-Muslim majority countries, who may rethink their intention to train in the U.S. because of the ban. The situation therefore merits the close attention of those who track physician supply, demand and access issues. Merritt Hawkins recently completed a white paper on IMGs examining what is required for them to practice in the U.S., how many there are and related topics, which I would be happy to email to readers. In addition, I would be happy to hear from those who have insights into this topic and can be reached here.


Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AMN).





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 2/22/2017 7:52:25 AM
Is There an Ideal Physician-to-Population Ratio?

Physician-to-Population Factors and Variances

Physician to population ratio

Hospitals, medical groups, physicians and other healthcare organizations and professionals often express interest in physician-to-population ratios. Are there ratios that show how many physicians in various specialties are needed to serve a population of 100,000? The answer is yes, there are several. However, caution should be exercised when considering these ratios because when it comes to medical service areas, one size does not fit all. 


A comprehensive medical staff plan will include not just physician-to-population ratios but also a complete analysis of local demographics as well as a portrait of the existing medical staff.


With that proviso in mind, suggested physician-to-population ratios are worth considering because they at least provide a baseline for how many physicians in various specialties a service area may need, and the base line can later be refined with more data. Perhaps the most prominent physician-to-population ratios are the ones promulgated by the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee (GMENAC). Other such ratios include the ones developed by researchers Hicks and Glenn and the consulting firm Solucient. However, all of these ratios, particularly GMENAC’s, which were released in 1980, are dated. 

 

The most recently developed ratios, and the ones Merritt Hawkins believes to be most pertinent, are those developed by the late noted physician supply and utilization expert Richard “Buz” Cooper, M.D. of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Cooper’s ratios are the most recent we are aware of and use a real world “demand-based” model to show how many physicians in various specialties a given service area may be able to support economically, rather than how many the area may theoretically need.


Below are some suggested physician-to-population ratios from three sources showing how the ratios may vary.

 

Suggested Physicians Per 100,000 Population 

 

                                           GMENAC                Solucient                  Cooper 

Family Medicine                    25.2                         22.5                         30.4

General Surgery                      9.7                          6.0                           7.9

 


The variances in these ratios illustrate why a more in-depth picture is needed when developing a medical staff plan to ensure the plan fits the characteristics of a particular service area. Those who would like Merritt Hawkins’ compendium of physician-to-population ratios are welcome to email me.


Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AMN).





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 2/1/2017 10:43:45 AM
Innovative Solutions in Pediatric to Adult Care Transitions

Join Merritt Hawkins for the 2017 Transitional Care Conference

North Texas 2017 Transition Care Conference

We hope that you will join us on Thursday, February 16th for the North Texas 2017 Transition Care Conference where we will be examining Innovative Solutions in Pediatric to Adult Care Transitions.


Merritt Hawkins is proud to be a silver sponsor for this conference. Attendees can receive CME credit for attending this conference. Additionally, those who attend will be provided information that will help you:

 

  • Examine the necessity for improving care transitions from the different stakeholders’ perspectives 
  • Learn at least four models of care transition practices 
  • Discuss the need for care transition improvements in North Texas 
  • Identify care transitions resources available via GotTransition.org  
  • Describe how care transitions curriculum can be developed and implemented into healthcare professions education

 

The conference will take place on Thursday, February 16th at the UNT Health Science Center Medical Education and Training Building on 1000 Montgomery Street in Fort Worth, Texas. To register for the conference, click here


We look forward to seeing you there.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 1/25/2017 9:58:14 AM
The Must-Know Healthcare Recruitment Trends for 2017

Healthcare Recruitment Trends You Should Follow in 2017


The Must-Know Healthcare Recruitment Trends for 2017

In their annual report highlighting the key issues impacting healthcare in the upcoming year, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) pegs 2017 as “a year of uncertainty and opportunity”. Healthcare appears to be at a crossroads with the election of Donald Trump and the projected first performance year for the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).


PwC notes that President-elect Trump has made repealing and replacing the ACA one of his top priorities, but most insurers will continue forward with the plans they have made involving MACRA. A cloud of uncertainty will remain until President-elect Trump gets into office and begins making plans for the future of healthcare in the United States.


But while the bureaucratic process sorts through the Affordable Care Act (ACA), state health insurance exchanges, and Medicaid, patients will continue to get sick, visit the hospital, and seek care from medical professionals. At the same time, healthcare facilities across the nation will be recruiting physicians to provide care for these patients. As we move into this year of uncertainty and opportunity, healthcare administrators must be prepared to adapt and innovate in the midst of a transforming healthcare system.


Following are some of the must-know healthcare recruitment trends for 2017:


Repeal and replace

Health organizations must be prepared for potential gains and losses of insured consumers due to modifications to the ACA.

Value-based care

The beginning of 2017 marks the first performance year for MACRA. Providing remedies for doctors drowning in data and minimizing the administrative burden on physicians will be vital.


Expanding technology use

The 21st century has introduced a wide variety of technological platforms into the healthcare industry. The coming year should not be any different with the advent of virtual reality, drones, 3D printing, and much more. Administrators must develop a strategic plan for coordination of technology use with physicians.

Aging physician workforce

A significant percent of physicians are at or near retirement age. Administrators need to be aware of any upcoming recruiting needs brought about by the retirement of their physicians.

Mental health in demand

In Merritt Hawkins 2016 Review of Physician and Advanced Practitioner Recruiting Incentives, psychiatry ranked as the second most requested search assignment. Recruiting psychiatrists is likely to become increasingly difficult as more and more facilities look to fill their mental health needs.

As the healthcare industry evolves, administrators and clinicians must keep pace. Staying up to date with changes in value-based care, technology use, and government action will help healthcare facilities in their pursuit of being modern and consumer-oriented systems.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 1/19/2017 11:37:33 AM
Top 8 Healthcare Staffing Blogs of 2016

Top Healthcare Staffing Stories from 2016


Top 8 Blog from 2016

2016 was a year filled with changes within the healthcare industry. Here are the top 8 blogs from Merritt Hawkins for the year, which cover topics such as physician compensation, the business of medicine, and the relationship between poverty and healthcare.


2016 Survey of America's Physicians

One of the largest physician surveys ever completed in the United States, Survey of America’s Physicians: Practice Patterns and Perspectives reveals an evolving physician workforce whose practice styles and attitudes are changing.


All Aboard: Physician Onboarding in 2016

Onboarding is the one of the first key steps in retaining physicians.


How much revenue do physicians generate for hospitals?

How much revenue do physicians generate on behalf of their affiliated hospitals through admissions, tests, prescriptions and other activity? Merritt Hawkins tackles this question in this study.


The One Book on Healthcare You Must Read

When discussing what makes people in the United States healthy or unhealthy, most Americans would likely say diet, exercise, obesity, social indiscretions, or genetics, but not poverty. Yet, poverty plays a crucial role in healthcare access.


The Potential Dark Side of the Physician Employment Boom

While serving its purpose in an economically and regulatory market, will physician employment be a positive trend for medicine in the long run?


A Good Time To Reflect on the Growing Role of PAs

PAs are making it much easier for Americans to obtain timely access to care.


Medical Residents and the “Business” of Medicine

Medicine is part art, part science and, to an often unsettling degree, part business.


Merritt Hawkins' Releases New, 2016 Review of Physician and Advanced Practitioner Recruiting Incentives

Merritt Hawkins’ Review is still the only data source in the market tracking physician and advanced practitioner starting salaries based on real-world recruiting assignments.





If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 1/10/2017 1:14:22 PM
Happy PA Week!

A Good Time To Reflect on the Growing Role of PAs


Happy PA Week!

 

By Mark Smith


October 6th – October 12th marks National Physician Assistant Week – a good time to reflect on how PAs are making a growing contribution to healthcare access and quality in the United States.


First and perhaps foremost, PAs are making it much easier for Americans to obtain timely access to care. In its 2010 study of physician supply and demand, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) projected that the nation would have 131,000 too few physicians by 2025 – an unprecendented shortage that would seriously undermine patient access to care. In its 2015 update of the study, AAMC revised its projections, indicating there will be up too 91,000 too few doctors by 2025.


This is still a significant and troubling shortage of physicians, but one that is less severe than it might have been if not for the presence of a growing number of PAs and nurse practitioners (NPs). The AAMC specifically cited the growing role of PAs and NPs as a primary reason it downgraded the coming shortage from 131,000 physicians to 91,000.


Contrary to popular perception, the physician shortage will not be confined to primary care. The AAMC indicates that by 2025 the nation will have approximately 30,000 too few primary care doctors and 60,000 too few specialists. Because about 70% of PAs are in specialty care, they will play an important role in alleviating the shortage of specialists and providing care for an aging population that will require a growing volume of specialty services.


In addition, the proliferation of the “convenient care movement,” which is most visibly reflected in the rapid construction of urgent care centers nationwide, would be virtually impossible without the services of PAs. Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), which now see close to 25 million underserved patients a year, were early adoptors of the team-based model of care and employ PAs in comparatively high numbers.


Ninety percent of patients surveyed in a study conducted by the Harris Poll on behalf of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA), said PAs make it easier to get an appointment and improve quality of care, showing that the important role PAs play has not gone unnoticed by the public.


Merritt Hawkins is proud to recruit PAs to hospitals, medical groups, urgent care centers, FQHCs and other facilities across the country. We extend our best wished to PAs nationwide during National PA Week and welcome any comments readers may have on the role PAs are playing in today’s evolving healthcare system.




Mark Smith is President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician and advanced practitioners search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here.


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category:
Posted by at 1/10/2017 1:09:46 PM
Merritt Hawkins in The News in Q4

Physicians Survey on HHS Nomination, Salary Trends, and More


It is part of our ongoing mission to educate clients and candidates on the physician shortage and other employment and salary trends facing healthcare organizations across the nation. As part of this mission, Merritt Hawkins provides thought leadership and shared resources to the healthcare recruitment industry. In fact, our company has published or is cited in hundreds of articles appearing in a wide range of publications. The following are news articles from October 2016 - December 2016 referencing Merritt Hawkins.


 




If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 1/3/2017 12:32:40 PM
Happy Holidays, Thank you for a great 2016!

Thanks for a great 2016!


Happy Holidays from Merritt Hawkins


Merritt Hawkins enjoyed a very busy and exciting 2016. In an industry that has been transforming significantly in recent years, with more changes on the horizon, we are grateful for the opportunity to have partnered with so many of you.


At the end of the day, our hope is that more patients can live healthier lives. We are grateful for the vital role that we play in helping clients reach their goals and provide patient care day in and day out.


With that in mind, we would like to thank you for partnering with us in 2016 and we hope that your 2017 is even better.


From the team at Merritt Hawkins, we wish you a happy and safe holiday season!




If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 12/28/2016 7:53:14 AM
Survey: How Physicians View HHS Secretary Nominee Dr. Tom Price

Physicians Weigh in on HHS Secretary Nominee


Physicians weigh in on Tom Price

By Tom Florence


If confirmed, president-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to head the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Tom Price, M.D., would be the first doctor to hold the position in over 20 years, and only the third in the 60-year history of HHS.


The American Medical Association (AMA) has endorsed the nomination of Dr. Price, but how do physicians feel?


Merritt Hawkins conducted an email survey of physicians on November 30 and December 1 to explore this question. Approximately 1,100 physicians responded to the survey, the results of which were the subject of several media articles, including one in MarketWatch (a feature of the Wall Street Journal) and one in HealthLeaders.


As these articles note, physicians are divided on Dr. Price. The plurality believe he will improve medical practice conditions for doctors, but the plurality also believe that, if confirmed, he would detract from the ability of patients to access quality care.


These are, of course, first impressions, and we will all have to wait on the confirmation process and what comes after to get a better sense of Dr. Price’s impact on the healthcare system.


In the meantime, I would be happy to email readers an infographic illustrating the results of this brief, three-question survey, and would also be interested in any initial thoughts readers may have about Dr. Price.

 




Tom Florence is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here.


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 12/14/2016 12:55:28 PM
New Survey Reveals Physician Assistant Recruiting Trends

2016 Survey of PA Recruiting and Employment Trends


2016 Survey of PA Recruiting

By Phillip Miller


In 1991, there were approximately 20,000 physician assistants (PAs) licensed to practice in the United States. Today, there are over 108,000, according to the American Academy of Physician Assistants (www.aapa.org).


How many hospitals now employ PAs, how many are actively recruiting them, and how do they fit into the emerging model of team-based care?


Merritt Hawkins and the AAPA recently cooperated on a survey that provides answers to these and related questions. The 2016 Survey of PA Recruiting and Employment Trends includes responses from human resources personnel at 287 hospitals nationwide regarding their facilities’ use of PAs. Survey data suggest that 90% of hospitals currently employ PAs, while 60% are actively recruiting them. Among hospitals of 100 beds or more, 87% are actively recruiting PAs, according to the survey


More key findings from the survey are illustrated in this infographic.


The survey also features an examination of the trends driving the increased use of PAs, including the physician shortage, new value-based payment models, the adoption of population health management, and the growing use of integrated clinical teams.


PAs represent an important resource of patient care expertise and are playing an increasingly pivotal role in the implementation of emerging delivery models. I would be happy to provide readers who email me with a complete copy of the 28-page survey report and welcome any comments about the role PAs are playing in today’s evolving healthcare system.

 




Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search and consulting firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS).


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 12/14/2016 7:12:08 AM
The 2016 AAMC Meeting and Academic Physician Recruiting

Trends in Physician Recruiting and Academic Medicine


Physician Recruiting and Academic Medicine at the 2016 AAMC Meeting

By Steven Price


Those seeking to better understand trends in academic medicine have an excellent opportunity to do so at the Association of American Medical College’s 2016 “Learn, Serve and Lead” meeting to be held November 11-14 in Seattle, Washington.


Merritt Hawkins’ Department of Academics will be exhibiting at the meeting, seeking both to absorb information and to share our experience and data in the area of recruiting for academic leadership, faculty and clinical positions.


In particular, we will be sharing copies of our white paper, The Changing Landscape in Academic Physician Recruiting. In this analysis, Merritt Hawkins outlines some of the trends that are causing academic medical centers to rethink traditional modes of recruiting in a response to a number of emerging and ongoing trends. These include the physician shortage, mounting financial pressures, growing medical school enrollment, system consolidation and the shift from volume to value-based payments.


To meet these challenges, many academic centers are revising their traditional compensation models, expanding traditional candidate parameters, and seeking ways to streamline the traditional candidate review and selection process.


In addition to the white paper, Merritt Hawkins Department of Academics will be sharing other thought leadership resources at the meeting pertaining to physician recruiting incentives, physician retention methods, and related topics. I hope you will have an opportunity to visit us at booth #409.


I would also be happy to share these and other resources with those not attending the meeting and can be reached here.

 




Steven Price is Vice President of Merritt Hawkins Department of Academics, a division of Merritt Hawkins specializing in the recruitment of leaders, faculty and clinical personnel at academic medical centers nationwide.


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 11/10/2016 1:56:15 PM
How the ACA Affects Healthcare Staffing

Physicians, Healthcare Professionals, and the ACA


How the ACA Affects Healthcare Staffing

By Tom Florence


While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has changed the way many Americans obtain health care insurance, this landmark law has reached into many other facets of healthcare delivery, including the area of healthcare staffing.


How has the ACA impacted the staffing of nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals at the nation’s various healthcare facilities?


Ralph Henderson, President of Professional Services and Staffing for AMN Healthcare, the nation’s largest healthcare staffing organization (of which Merritt Hawkins is a division) recently addressed this question in an article appearing in The Staffing Stream, a publication of Staffing Industry Analysts.


Mr. Henderson first addresses the effect the ACA has had on accelerating demand for healthcare professionals by significantly increasing the ranks of the insured. He notes that according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the gap between healthcare job openings and job hires has been growing since 2014 and currently stands at nearly a half-million unfilled jobs.


He further describes how the ACA promotes and incentivizes new models of care, including population health management, home health, team-based care and the increasing use of health information technology. All of these trends hold implications for staffing, as new delivery models require the increased use of care coordinators, information management specialists, advanced practice professionals and other types of professionals.


The ACA has also affected the staffing of leadership positions, as more organizations seek “change agents” who can lead their organizations from the world of fee-for-volume and into the world of fee-for value.”


A complete copy of the article can be viewed here.


The article points to the direction that healthcare staffing is headed and may be of interest to those who follow this topic. I would be happy to hear from readers who have further ideas on how the ACA will shape healthcare staffing trends.




Tom Florence is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached here.


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 11/10/2016 12:23:19 PM
A Winning Partnership: FQHCs and Merritt Hawkins

[Video] Merritt Hawkins Proudly Supports FQHCs


Merritt Hawkins is proud to be the sole preferred staffing partner for permanent physician searches for Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). It is the nation’s FQHCs that are tasked with providing quality, accessible care to underserved populations throughout the country, regardless of their ability to pay or health insurance status. FQHCs see over 24 million patients a year and Merritt Hawkins is happy to partner with them to support the vision.


 


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 11/10/2016 7:23:16 AM
We hope to see you in San Francisco at the MGMA Conference

Meet up with Merritt Hawkins at the MGMA Conference


MGMA Conference in San Francisco

Merritt Hawkins will be attending the upcoming Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) Annual Conference Oct. 30 - Nov. 2 in San Francisco, and you should too!


The MGMA represents the interests and offers educational and other support services to 33,000 healthcare administrators and executives throughout 18,000 healthcare organizations nationwide that include over 385,000 physicians.


This conference will be an excellent opportunity for you to interact with colleagues, medical practice executives, physicians, administrators, industry experts and dynamic speakers. You will be able discuss challenges and determine ideal benchmarks, measures, and solutions to take your practice to the next level.


Additionally, the main stage sessions will feature New York Times best-selling author Daniel H. Pink as well as comedian Jim Gaffigan. You won’t want to miss these sessions.


Merritt Hawkins will be among the exhibitors sharing information, including our 2016 Review of Physician and Advanced Practitioner Recruiting Incentives, 2016 Survey of America’s Physicians, 2016 Physician Inpatient/Outpatient Revenue Survey, and new white papers on population health management, the patient physician access index, and others. We will be at booth #500 and we would love to meet with you.


If you would like to arrange a time for a brief consultation at the conference, please feel free to send us an email.




If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 11/10/2016 7:17:47 AM
Feeling the Burn: Physician Burnout in America

Career Dissatisfaction Among Doctors is Growing


Physician Burnout in America

By Kurt Mosley


There is an old adage that one human year is equal to seven dog years since dogs age more quickly than we do. The same can be said about healthcare in America over the last five years – it seems we have packed 20 year’s worth of changes into just three or four actual years. Our physicians have dealt with more changes in that short time period than they have since the implementation of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. As a result of the ever-expanding amount of changes, burnout has become more common among physicians than any other group of US workers.


A recent survey conducted by Merritt Hawkins on behalf of the Physicians Foundation asked the question: “To what extent do you have feelings of professional burnout in your medical career”? Nearly half of the physicians responding said they had either frequent or constant feelings of burnout. On the flip side of the question, only about 11% indicated they had no such feelings of burnout. According to survey data, physician specialists at the front line of care seem more prone to burnout. Almost 50% of the physician specialists stated they had feelings of professional burnout “often or always”. In addition, more female doctors than male (51% to 47%) reported feelings of frequent or constant burnout.


The key to reducing physician burnout is establishing the root causes. Suggested contributing factors are:

 


  • Government and industry regulation
  • Non-clinical paperwork
  • Lack of time available for patients
  • Uncertainty of the future of medicine
  • Confidence in career choice

 


According to the survey, regulatory and paperwork burdens were the most cited factors causing physician dissatisfaction. The fact that physicians report low professional satisfaction due to regulatory and paperwork burdens makes sense as healthcare is the most highly regulated profession in the United States. The Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Bill passed in 2010 is over 2,500 pages in length. The new MACRA law, which recently changed the way physicians are now to be paid under Medicare, is over 900 pages. The enactment of Medicare and Medicaid Bill of 1965 was just over 400 pages in length.


The second most frustrating factor cited in the survey was erosion of clinical autonomy. When asked what factors they find most satisfying about medical practice, physicians cited patient relationships (73.8%) as number one. The erosion of clinical autonomy and lack of face-time with patients go hand in hand. The growing number of government regulations and third-party interventions creates an even bigger roadblock for physicians to achieving their goal of developing patient relationships.


We must look at the burdens we are placing on today’s doctors and let them do what they do best. We must support them in their efforts to take care of the healthcare population in the way they see fit. Our doctors spend anywhere from 12 to 16 years training for their profession, but the way they practice is often directed and guided by a person who may have less than 6 months of experience in the healthcare industry. It is time to recognize and correct the issues that cause career dissatisfaction and burnout for doctors in the United States so they can focus on the health and well-being of their patients.


To receive a copy of the full survey report please click here.




A_Raised_Hand_Kurt_Mosley_Merritt_Hawkins A Raised Hand will address the questions and concerns of healthcare facilities on emerging trends and offer practical solutions to some of the most pressing staffing challenges today. Kurt Mosley, Vice President of Strategic Alliances for Merritt Hawkins, an AMN Healthcare company, is nationally recognized as a leading authority on a wide range of health care staffing issues and trends. 

A nationally noted speaker and frequently cited expert, Mr. Mosley has addressed dozens of state hospital associations and other health professional groups across the country.  He can be reached at kurt.mosley@amnhealthcare.com or you can follow his updates on Twitter at @kurt_mosley.

 

Category: A Raised Hand
Posted by at 11/10/2016 6:48:50 AM
2016 Survey of America's Physicians

[Video] Physician Survey: Key Findings


 

One of the largest physician surveys ever completed in the United States, Survey of America’s Physicians: Practice Patterns and Perspectives reveals an evolving physician workforce whose practice styles and attitudes are changing. Based on over 17,263 physicians nationwide, this physician survey is conducted by Merritt Hawkins on behalf of The Physicians Foundation, a non-profit organization that seeks to advance the work of practicing physicians and help facilitate the delivery of healthcare to patients.

To download and read the complete Merritt Hawkins' Survey, click the button below the video.


 

If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Download Survey

 

 


Category:
Posted by at 11/7/2016 9:31:13 AM
Merritt Hawkins in the News - Review of Q3

Physician Survey, Salaries, and More


It is part of our ongoing mission to educate clients and candidates on the physician shortage and other employment and salary trends facing healthcare organizations across the nation. As part of this mission, Merritt Hawkins provides thought leadership and shared resources to the healthcare recruitment industry. In fact, our company has published or is cited in hundreds of articles appearing in a wide range of publications. The following are news articles from July 2016 - September 2016 referencing Merritt Hawkins.


 


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.



Category:
Posted by at 10/27/2016 10:16:10 AM
Hospital Revenue, Physician Compensation and Healthcare Trends

Merritt Hawkins In the News - Review of Q2


It is part of our ongoing mission to educate clients and candidates on the physician shortage and other employment and salary trends facing healthcare organizations across the nation. As part of this mission, Merritt Hawkins provides thought leadership and shared resources to the healthcare recruitment industry. In fact, our company has published or is cited in hundreds of articles appearing in a wide range of publications. The following are news articles from April 2016 - June 2016 referencing Merritt Hawkins.


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.


Category:
Posted by at 10/27/2016 8:45:44 AM
In Which States are Physicians Paid on “Quality?”

Physician Compensation and Quality-based Metrics


Physician Compensation and quality-based metrics

 

By Phil Miller


In which states are physicians most likely to have their compensation tied to quality-based metrics? Which states have the highest rate of physician ACO participation? Which states have the highest rates of physician practice ownership?


Merritt Hawkins recently completed a survey of over 17,000 physicians on behalf of The Physicians Foundation that offers answers to these and related questions. A compendium of information with over one million data points, the survey offers a multi-dimensional look at physician practice patterns, with results broken out my gender, age, specialty vs. primary care, and independent practice owners vs. employed physicians. Results also are broken out by state, allowing for rankings in certain categories. Examples include:


Top 5 states/physician compensation
tied to quality
                   % physicians with comp
  tied to quality
Wisconsin 64.1%
        Hawaii           59.4%
Indiana 55.3%
Nebraska 51.9%
Delaware 51.6%
Average, all U.S. 42.8%



          Top 5 states/private practice
ownership
                             % physicians in                          
         private practice
South Dakota 45.9%
        Texas           44.2%
New Jersey 44.1%
Georgia 41.9%
North Carolina 41.3%
Average, all U.S. 32.7%


These data points, and many others from the survey, illustrate the extent to which physicians are participating in the various mechanisms of health care reform, including value-based payments, employment, ACO participation, EHR implementation and others. The survey also shows regional differences among physicians and differences by age, gender and other metrics.


Offering a detailed portrait of today’s doctors, the survey is a valuable resource for healthcare facility administrators, policy makers, and physicians themselves. I would be happy to email a copy of the full 82-page survey report to those who contact me here and I look forward to any questions or comments you may have about its findings.




Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS).


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category:
Posted by at 10/4/2016 12:03:01 PM
The One Book on Healthcare You Must Read

Poverty and Healthcare Reform


Poverty and Healthcare Book

What’s wrong with America’s healthcare system? Why do we pay so much more than most developed countries but produce outcomes that often are worse than those achieved elsewhere?


For years, the finger of blame has been pointed at physicians, hospitals and the fee-for-service payment model, all of which are alleged to drive up costs and to create a system rife with inefficiency and waste. This waste is so pervasive, policy  makers and pundits have alleged, that it accounts for 30% of healthcare spending – close to one trillion dollars a year, and all of it unnecessary.


Now a new and provocative book has challenged this assumption. Poverty and the Myths of Health Reform by the late Richard “Buz” Cooper, M.D. posits a different reason for the extravagant spending and apparently substandard results produced  by the U.S. healthcare system. The problem is not waste or greed, but poverty. The poor, who suffer from more chronic illnesses and much shorter life spans than the better off, are inherently expensive to treat, and high healthcare spending is the  result not of a wasteful healthcare system but of short-sighted social policy.


The Physicians Foundation, which commissioned the book, has produced a video about it that offers additional insights into Dr. Cooper’s thesis. But the best way to absorb the book’s vital message is to order it from Johns Hopkins Press.


The book offers a clear argument and compelling data demonstrating that America’s healthcare system is as efficient and effective as those of other developed countries once the impact of poverty has been truly accounted for. No long-term reform or enhancement of our current healthcare system can be attempted without absorbing this fundamental fact.


Buz Cooper

Merritt Hawkins was proud to work with Dr. Cooper and support his research on physician shortages and related workforce matters. We deeply regret his recent passing but believe his work will have a continued impact on the nation’s healthcare policy, as it should.


I would welcome any comments from those who know of Dr. Cooper or who have read Poverty and the Myths of Health Reform.




Phillip Miller is Vice President of Communications for Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS).


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category:
Posted by at 9/28/2016 11:35:25 AM
Primary Care Physicians: Healthcare’s Jack-of-all-Trades

Is the United States facing a shortage of physicians?


Physician Shortage

Most healthcare policy analysts, academics, and others who study this question believe that it is, and that the shortage is likely to become more pronounced over the next five to ten years. In March 2015, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) released a new physician supply study projecting a shortage of up to 90,400 physicians by 2025. Furthermore, the AAMC projects the shortage in primary care will reach 31,100 by 2025 while demand for specialists will exceed supply by 63,700 by 2025.


Primary care physicians are the “quarterbacks” of clinician teams whose job is to provide care and maintenance for the whole patient and for whole populations of patients. The implementation of the population health management model will likely be driven through inter-professional care teams, in which collaborative practice techniques will replace the current approach, where clinicians often train and practice in silos.


In order to prepare primary care physicians to lead these clinician teams, some medical schools have begun re-designing their curriculums to account for changes in patient care.


At Indiana University's school of medicine, all students who plan to go into primary care will receive an expanded dermatological curriculum. By introducing these courses into the program, IU hopes to sharpen the dermatological skills of primary care physicians to reduce the work load put on specialists. Likewise, the University of Massachusetts Medical School offers a certificate program in primary care behavioral health to fill the gaps left by traditional mental health training programs in the hope of reducing pressure on psychiatrists.


As the physician shortage persists, the role of our primary care physicians and the prevalence of population health will continue to grow. Merritt Hawkins provides more information about this practice model in our white paper, Population Health Management and Physician Staffing. Those who would like a copy of the white paper are welcome to email me at derek.klein@amnhealthcare.com.




If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category:
Posted by at 8/23/2016 2:06:07 PM
AMN Family Member Makes the Olympic Team

Who to Watch at the Olympics


MH_Olympics_Golf

For this year’s Olympic games in Rio, we have an AMN “family member” who is on the Olympic team and her story is nothing short of incredible.


Gerina Piller grew up playing sports her whole life, but it wasn’t until she was fifteen that she started playing golf. Three years after picking up her first golf clubs she earned a division one scholarship. She continued to excel, and two years after graduating from college she made it onto the pro women’s tour and was a contestant on the Golf Channel's Big Break: Prince Edward Island series. Golf has not been a part of the Olympics for 112 year, but this year it will be included, and in July, Gerina clinched a spot on the USA Olympic team.


“Representing my country at the world’s greatest athletic event would be an honor and privilege unlike any other, so I am excited to announce that I will be going to Rio,” Gerina told the USA Today in an interview.


It also just so happens that Gerina is related to one of our Marketers here at Merritt Hawkins, Nathan Piller. Nathan is not only very supportive of his sister-in-law, but his work ethic is very motivated by seeing her accomplish her dreams and by watching his PGA pro golfer brother Martin as well.


“She has had an amazing 24 months. It looks easy when you see it on TV, but in reality, it isn’t,” said Nathan. “All the on the course and off the course duties, including travel, are extremely demanding. Like many individuals at AMN, it’s the work you do when no one is watching that makes you great. It’s paid off, she is top 15 in the world.”


Here at Merritt Hawkins, we strive to be the best no matter what comes our way. Every day we work hard to challenge ourselves to go the distance and do our job with excellence. This same work ethic and passion is what has made Gerina so successful in her golf career. Ever since Gerina Piller was fifteen she has dedicated herself to the game of golf but has always stayed humble by putting family first and golf second.


The women’s tournament in Rio begins August 17th and consists of 72 holes of stroke play. You can follow Gerina and her journey throughout the 2016 Olympics by following her on Twitter (@Gerinapiller) and by visiting the individual women’s website here. You can also read more about Gerina Piller and her career as a pro golfer here.




If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category:
Posted by at 8/9/2016 8:18:12 AM
Merritt Hawkins Supports FQHCs With Bronze Sponsorship During National Health Center Week

Merritt Hawkins is Proud to Partner with FQHCs


Health Center Week

By Travis Singleton


Merritt Hawkins is proud to be a long-time supporter of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and to be the sole preferred partner for permanent physician search of the National Association of Community Health Center’s Value in Staffing Program.


Merritt Hawkins is further supporting FQHCs with a $10,000 National Health Center Week Bronze Sponsorship. Made to the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC), the sponsorship will help forward the vital work FQHCs do providing healthcare services through thousands of sites across the country.


In addition to the Bronze Sponsorship, Merritt Hawkins will be supporting celebration activities at three FQHCs during National Health Center Week, including the Cumming Family Health Center in Cumming, Georgia; Utah Health Centers in Salt Lake City, Utah; and Community Health Service Agency, in Greenville, Texas.


Activities at the FQHCs will feature legislative visits, a baseball game with postgame fireworks, children’s games, snow cone giveaways, as well as various educational and vendor booths. Merritt Hawkins’ executives will present a plaque to each of the three health centers recognizing their commitment to community health and will speak on the central role FQHCs play in providing quality, affordable care to medically underserved populations.


Merritt Hawkins continues to support FQHCs year-round with thought leadership resources, including white papers and speaking presentations, and with our unique-to-the-industry Pro Bono Physician Search Program for FQHCs. I would be happy to share a copy of our most recent white paper, entitled Topic Guide for FQHCs: Physician Recruiting and Retention, to readers who may find it useful. Please contact me at travis.singleton@merritthawkins.com and have a great National Health Center Week!




Travis Singleton is senior vice president of Merritt Hawkins, a company of AMN Healthcare. He can be reached at travis.singleton@merritthawkins.com.  


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category:
Posted by at 8/5/2016 6:32:50 AM
Peace of Mind: Mental Health in America

How to Address Mental Health Most Effectively


Mental Health in America

By Kurt Mosley


At the beginning of the year, I wrote a blog entitled The Winds of Change in American Healthcare that discussed the introduction of the Mental Health Reform Act of 2015 by Senators Bill Cassidy and Christopher Murphy. The goal of the legislation was to make comprehensive mental health care a reality. Since that time, the Mental Health Reform Act of 2015 has been renamed the Mental Health Reform Act of 2016: A Bill to Address the Mental Health Crisis in America. The Senate will soon begin debate of the bill and will address key facts such as:


  • 1 in 5 adults in the United States had a mental health condition in the past year according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

  • 60 percent of adults with mental illness did not receive treatment for their condition

  • Only about half of adolescents with a mental illness received treatment for their condition

  • Absence of treatment can lead to dropping out of school, substance use disorders, incarceration, unemployment, homelessness, and suicide


Another fact for Senate members to keep in mind is that life expectancy in the United States has reached a record high of 78.8 years! According to the Centers for Disease Control, the number of cancer survivors will grow 30% (18 million) from 2010 to 2020. Additionally, one out of every three Americans born today will live to be over the age of 100. As life expectancy increases and Americans live longer, mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s and dementia will likely become more commonplace.


A recent study from Health Affairs indicated that in 2013 an estimated $201 billion was spent on mental disorders, more than any other medical condition. Mental health expenditures exceeded medical spending on heart conditions, trauma, cancer, and pulmonary conditions. Early detection and treatment (i.e. reduction in smoking, controlling hypertension) have been key in reducing the rate of spending on heart disease. The same formula (early detection and treatment) will be the key to improving the quality of life of individuals with mental health conditions and controlling the cost of care for years to come.




A_Raised_Hand_Kurt_Mosley_Merritt_Hawkins A Raised Hand will address the questions and concerns of healthcare facilities on emerging trends and offer practical solutions to some of the most pressing staffing challenges today. Kurt Mosley, Vice President of Strategic Alliances for Merritt Hawkins, an AMN Healthcare company, is nationally recognized as a leading authority on a wide range of health care staffing issues and trends. 

A nationally noted speaker and frequently cited expert, Mr. Mosley has addressed dozens of state hospital associations and other health professional groups across the country.  He can be reached at kurt.mosley@amnhealthcare.com or you can follow his updates on Twitter at @kurt_mosley.

 

If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category:
Posted by at 8/3/2016 8:50:58 AM
12 Keys to Creating an Exceptional Practice Opportunity - Part II

How to Make Your Practice a Recruiting Success


How to Make Your Practice a Physician Recruiting Success

By Mark Smith


Last week we began a series on how to make your practice a physician recruiting success. You can read the first part of the series here.


Hospitals, medical groups, Federally Qualified Health Centers and other facilities typically face impediments of one kind or another which challenge their ability to recruit physicians.


Some facilities may be located in remote areas that historically are medically underserved. Others may have a prohibitively high cost of living, or feature weather extremes that make it difficult to generate physician interest.


These and similar local geographic, social and economic factors fall into the category of things health- care facilities cannot control. They are what they are.


What healthcare facilities can control to a significant extent is the quality of practice they offer physicians. Since physicians will be spending most of their time in the practice, and derive their professional satisfaction from it, it is imperative that the practice be as appealing as possible. Due to the profound changes taking place in healthcare today, many physicians are looking for a place where the “grass is greener,” so it is particularly important to offer a practice opportunity that stands out from others that physician candidates may be seeking.


Following are some of the keys to creating an optimum practice opportunity:


  • Make electronic health records (EHR) easy (or as easy as possible). Some practices employ medical scribes to make data entry easier for physicians, some bring in locum tenens providers in order to give physicians a block of time to learn new EHR systems, and others invest considerable resources in standardizing EHR to facilitate communication throughout an integrated network. Like compensation metrics, EHR remains in flux, but it is clear that efficient EHR systems will become an even more important recruiting factor in the future.

  • Implement a hospitalist program. Inpatient work for primary care doctors is becoming a thing of the past, but the hospitalist model also is extending to obstetrics/gynecology and even surgery. As a general rule, the less inpatient work that is required of a physician, the more attractive the practice.

  • Pay for ED call. Covering the ED used to be part of a physician’s informal obligation to the hospital, but today it is a service for which physicians commonly are paid. Rates for ED call by specialty can be found in the Medical Group Management Association’s survey on this topic.

  • Maintain appropriate nurse and other clinician staffing levels. Physicians want their patients well treated and usually respond poorly when they hear reports of treatment delays, inattentiveness and other results of understaffing. In addition, today many (though not all) physicians support the use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners to handle more routine cases, expand hours, and focus on patient education and follow-up.

  • Be efficient. Physicians can only be relieved of so much paperwork, but to the extent that coding and billing duties can be competently handled by others they should be. In addition, make test turnaround timely, access to patient data and the OR convenient, promote enhanced ER triage, and even sweat the details such as close, covered parking for the medial staff. Let physicians focus on what they were trained to do and want to do (see patients) and try to relieve them of the rest.

  • Communicate, and give physicians a voice. This is the most important consideration of all. Communications levels tend to fall after a physician is recruited, but they should be maintained formally, through physician work satisfaction surveys and regular catch-up sessions that are not performance evaluations. In addition, physicians should given a strong voice on all matters pertaining to quality of care, schedules, compensation formulas, and the direction of the practice. Though they may not literally own the practice, they should be given psychological ownership of it.


Given a pervasive physician shortage, even practices located in “destinations spots” such as coastal or mountainous areas can find it challenging to recruit physicians today. Nevertheless, those facilities that make their opportunities as open, fair, and remunerative as possible can continue to have consistent recruiting success.




Mark Smith is the President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS). He can be reached at  Mark.Smith@merritthawkins.com.


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 7/25/2016 12:08:18 PM
12 Keys to Creating an Exceptional Practice Opportunity - Part I

How to Make Your Practice a Recruiting Success


12 Keys to Creating a Premiere Practice Opportunity

By Mark Smith


Hospitals, medical groups, Federally Qualified Health Centers and other facilities typically face impediments of one kind or another which challenge their ability to recruit physicians.


Some facilities may be located in remote areas that historically are medically underserved. Others may have a prohibitively high cost of living, or feature weather extremes that make it difficult to generate physician interest.


These and similar local geographic, social and economic factors fall into the category of things health- care facilities cannot control. They are what they are.


What healthcare facilities can control to a significant extent is the quality of practice they offer physicians. Since physicians will be spending most of their time in the practice, and derive their professional satisfaction from it, it is imperative that the practice be as appealing as possible. Due to the profound changes taking place in healthcare today, many physicians are looking for a place where the “grass is greener,” so it is particularly important to offer a practice opportunity that stands out from others that physician candidates may be seeking.


Following are some of the keys to creating an optimum practice opportunity:


  • Be open, fair and remunerative. These three terms sum up the characteristics of a positive practice environment. Communication, work policies and expectations in the practice should be open, formal and informal, and easily understood. The methods by which physicians are evaluated and rewarded should be fair and consistent for all parties. Compensation should be reasonably competitive for the specialty based on local and even national standards.

  • Have a vision. Physicians in this time of historic transition need to know where the practice is heading in the short-term and the long-term. Will it embrace new value-based reimbursement models? Will there be mergers or partnerships with other larger entities? Will it incorporate team-based medicine, population health management, the patient-centered medical home, or become part of an Accountable Care Organization? It is important to have a roadmap showing physicians where the practice is now and where it is going.

  • Formalize expectations. In addition to knowing where the practice is heading, physicians need to know exactly what will be expected of them. In the interest of being “open,” let candidates know in writing the hours they will be expected to keep, number of patients they will be expected to see, types of patients, governance responsibilities, and additional expectations. Confusion over expectations (a feeling of “this is not what I thought it would be”) is the primary cause of physician turnover in Merritt Hawkins’ experience.

  • Be flexible. Physicians are becoming more diverse in many ways and one practice size may not fit all, particularly when it comes to schedules. Part-time schedules and other flexible practice options are becoming more important to physicians than most others factors, including compensation.

  • Employ the physician. Merritt Hawkins’ 2015 Review of Physician and Advanced Practitioner Recruiting Incentives indicates that approximately 95% of our physician recruiting assignments in 2014/15 featured a setting in which the physician was to be employed, either by a hospital, medical group, FQHC, academic center, urgent care center or other facility. This is a profound reversal of the situation 27 years ago when Merritt Hawkins was established and the overwhelming number of searches we conducted featured an independent, private practice setting. The majority of physicians today are seeking such settings, and it is difficult to recruit consistently without offering this option.

  • Make compensation clear. While the practice should be remunerative, as stated above, how physicians are compensated today is just as important as how much they are compensated. The key is to keep compensation formulas clear, understandable, and logical. Increasingly, some portion of physician compensation today is linked to value-based metrics such as patient satisfaction scores, adherence to treatment protocols, and others. These are balanced against volume-based metrics such as Relative Value Units (RVUs), net revenue, and patients seen that are needed to keep physicians productive. Finding that balance is difficult, to say the least, but necessary in today’s practice environment.


Part 2 of this series will be posted next week so stay tuned!




Mark Smith is the President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS). He can be reached at  Mark.Smith@merritthawkins.com.


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

 


Category: Recruiting Physicians
Posted by at 7/19/2016 2:15:15 PM
Merritt Hawkins Accepting Applications for the 2016 FQHC Pro Bono Physician Search

Merritt Hawkins' 2016 FQHC Pro Bono Physician Search Program Is Underway


Pro Bono Search

By Travis Singleton


It has never been easy to recruit physicians to small towns and other traditionally underserved areas, and with the national physician shortage, it is only getting harder.


It is the nation’s Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) that are tasked with providing quality, accessible care to underserved populations throughout the country, regardless of their ability to pay or health insurance status. FQHCs see over 24 million patients a year, but FQHCs could serve 2 million more patients a year if all health center clinical vacancies were filled today.


As the National Association of Community Health Center’s (NACHC) sole preferred staffing partner for permanent physician search, Merritt Hawkins understands the mission of FQHCs. That is one reason Merritt Hawkins conducts its FQHC Pro Bono Physician Search Program – to highlight the growing challenges facing underserved communities that are in desperate need of physicians. The program also is Merritt Hawkins’ way of saying thank you to the many facilities in small towns and other underserved communities that have entrusted us with their recruiting needs over the years.


Merritt Hawkins is pleased to announce that applications for the 2016 FQHC Pro Bono Physician Search Program, in which we will locate a physician for a FQHC and waive all of our professional fees, are now available.


Applications for the program are due August 10, 2016, and any FQHC is eligible.


To access the Merritt Hawkins’ FQHC Pro Bono Search application form, click here.


I would be happy to address any questions readers have about this unique program and can be contacted at at Travis.Singleton@merritthawkins.com.



Start My Application 





Travis Singleton is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS). 


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.


Category:
Posted by at 7/13/2016 2:06:37 PM
Physician Identity and a True “Country Doctor”

Rural Medical Practitioners Have a Crucial Role


Physician in rural setting

By Travis Singleton


Healthcare is becoming an increasingly corporate enterprise, with physicians filling the role of “employee.” It therefore is becoming harder and harder to answer the question, “who owns the patient?” anymore. That is why examples of special physicians who go the extra mile for their patients are that much more impactful. Merritt Hawkins, and our sister company, Staff Care, are proud to be part of an organization (AMN Healthcare) that sponsors the national Country Doctor of the Year Award to highlight physicians who do just that.


First awarded in 1992 to legendary Louisiana physician John Harlan Haynes, M.D. (known to his patients as “a cross between Marcus Welby and Daniel Boone”), the award honors the spirit, skill and dedication of America’s rural medical practitioners.


What has made this award so meaningful and prominent over the last 25 years is the quality of the physicians who receive it. This year’s award recipient, Dr. Jasmine Sulaiman of Cleveland, Texas, is no exception, as this article makes clear.


We believe it is physicians like Dr. Sulaiman, the first Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) physician to win the award, who will inspire the next generation of physicians to embrace the challenges and rewards of rural medicine. According to the National Rural Health Association, approximately 1,000 physicians leave rural practice every year, and only 700 take their place. Rural physicians not only are key caregivers in their communities, their presence sustains the economies of small towns through the $2.2 million in economic activity they generate per physician and the 14 jobs they support. It is vital that young doctors continue to uphold the tradition of the country doctor, and that is what the award is all about. As the identity of physicians continues to evolve, it is important to remember the remarkable impact that highly dedicated doctors continue to have.


If you know of an outstanding country doctor, I hope you will take the time to nominate him or her for the 2017 Country Doctor of the Year Award. A nomination form, and a description of Staff Care’s previous Country Doctor of the Year Award winners, can be accessed at www.staffcare.com.


Also, if you have any stories about great country doctors you know or have encountered, please feel welcome to share them.




Travis Singleton is Senior Vice President of Merritt Hawkins, the nation’s leading physician search firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS). He can be reached at  Travis.Singleton@merritthawkins.com.

 


If you are interested in learning more about our advanced practice and physician staffing services, request an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.





Category:
Posted by at 6/28/2016 12:20:26 PM


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